Passion of The Game of Bridge

Bridge Basic

Posted by on 30 Apr 2010

There are 2 important special bids that can be made in addition of those 35 bids: Double (X) and Redouble (XX). And because it’s special bids, they have special requirement and special purpose as well.

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Bidding System

Better Minor vs Short Club: Which One Is Better?

Posted by on 27 Jul 2015

Better Minor vs Short Club: quantitative statistical show down – which one do you think the better system. Read and try made up your mind..

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News

Sweden, England, Hungary seize World Bridge Championship 2012

Posted by on 26 Aug 2012

In Lille, France 2012, as part of International Mind Sport Association movement, the 14th World Bridge Championship was held in between Bermuda Bowl’s year. And this time, without any doubt, the European teams have excelled and dominated the world of bridge. Here is the story…

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Advanced

Double Squeeze-Finesse in Sarundajang Cup

Posted by on 29 Aug 2015

Watching a beautiful play in elite tournament is what will make Bridge an interesting event to watch. In this article, we’ll see an elegant play by Indonesian national player in knockout team event that involve not only a double squeeze setup, but also the choice of correct contract.

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Recent Posts

Opening Lead Mini Course: Understand What To Do – 1 of 4

Statistically in general, you will spend 25% of your game of bridge doing the opening lead. Most of the time the contract is not really sensitive to the opening lead. But with the bidding become more precise and aggressive where wrong opening lead can determine whether a slam or game is made, then to make sure the person across the table cannot whinge and to make you a more than average bridge player, for sure there are some good guideline or maybe rule of thumb when it comes to do opening lead. This is one of them…

This article is one out of three about Opening Lead. See: Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

Directing Lead Double: Make Defense Easier

Directing Lead Double: Make Defense Easier

A “double” bid in bridge is a special bid with various use. You can use it for takeout or negative (asking partner to bid longest suit, basically), to penalize opponent to to resume disrupted bidding system (for example: DOPE/ROPE). On this article, we will see how it can be used for lead directing, to make the opening lead much more certain and easier.

Opening Lead Mini Course: Which Card ? – 4 of 4

Statistically in general, you will spend 25% of your game of bridge doing the opening lead. After you know which suit to lead (see previous part), the final thing is to select a card from that suit that you will put on the table for the opening lead. This part is actually the easiest among all the opening lead techniques and guideline. Why? Because this is merely just the agreement with your partner. As long as you and partner has agreed, that will do.

This article is one out of three about Opening Lead. See: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

Negative Double vs TakeOut Double: No more confusion

Negative Double vs TakeOut Double: No more confusion

Most bridge players play both takeout double and negative double on their system. Although very similar in principle, there are quite subtle different that we all should be aware. This differences might determine whether you miss a game or not.

5 Card Major (Heart/Spade) in 1NT Opening (Weak or Strong)?

One of the top question during establishing a bidding system is whether or not to open 1NT with 5 cards Major (Heart or Spade) 5-3-3-2. So, why or why not we should include 5 card major – balance into 1NT Opening. What’s the pluses and minuses… ? Let’s get started

The Advantages of Opening 1NT (No Trump): A Bridge Hidden Gem

Regardless of the flavor of 1NT opening that you and your partner chose (Weak No Trump 12-15hcp, Strong NT 16-18hcp or Mini NT 10-12hcp, with or without 5 card Major, etc), there are certain advantages that can make Opening 1 NT a hidden gem to advance your bridge experience.

Rebid: Longer Suit or Second suit?

Rebid: Longer Suit or Second suit?

The common problem during bidding when you have long suit (say 6+ cards) and 2nd suit (4+ cards) is whether to show the extra on the un-usually longer suit, or rebid the second suit. But what if you have the chance to show both with smarter bidding ?

Useful Mini Sequence after 1NT rebid of 1C/1D opening With No 4cd Support

It is quite often that you have 5 or more cards major (/)when partner open on 1 minor (1 or 1). Obviously you will respond 1H or 1S  (unless you are very weak that allow you to pass) – this ,of course, only promising 4 cards. When partner did not support, hence denying 4 cards support and bid 1NT instead (i.e: at least doubleton support, unless 4-4-4-1), your next move probably to check whether partner has 3 card supports. With 3 card support partner cannot raise to 2M (unless very very good 3 cards like AKJ) – so your bidding system need to be able to cater this possibility.

Based on what so-called “Check back Stayman” convention, this is the simplified requirement:

  1. You open 1 minor (1 or 1)
  2. Partner respond 1/1
  3. You rebid 1NT
  4. Opponent did not disturb – no competitive bidding
  5. Then 2 bidding from partner is “Check Back Stayman” and the answer cannot be higher than partner suit:
    • 2 : no 3 card support of partner’s major – cannot bid 2 or 2
    • 2: 3 card support (only if partner bid 1) – if partner bid 1, then this bid means 4 cards .
    • 2: 3 card support (only if partner bid 1)

Therefore:

1 – 1 // 1NT – 2:

  • 2: there is no 3 cards support
  • 2: 3 cards support
  • 2: not used – answer cannot be higher than partner suit

—–

1 – 1 // 1NT – 2:

  • 2: there is no 3 cards support
  • 2: 4 cards
  • 2: 3 cards support

—–

1 – 1 // 1NT – 2:

  • 2: no 3 cards
  • 2: 3 cards support
  • 2: not used – answer cannot be higher than partner suit

—–

1 – 1 // 1NT – 2:

  • 2: no 3 cards
  • 2: 4 cards
  • 2: 3 cards support

—–

The bidder of Checkback Stayman can be weak or strong – it depends on the subsequent bidding:  rebid of Major or 3 are non forcing, 3 Major or 2NT are invitational.

This convention is very useful and effective to find 5-3 fit without guessing anymore. The only drawback is that you cannot “stop” at 2C. If you play short C system where 1C can be 2 cards C only, then it probably will not matter much. But even with 1C minimum 3 cards – convenient minor, probably passing 1NT with 5-3 fit in C produce more trick than 2C.

Give this convention a try !