Passion of The Game of Bridge

Bidding, Play & Misclaim (?) Trouble at Sarundajang Cup

Bidding, Play & Misclaim (?) Trouble at Sarundajang Cup

In every tournament, with fatigue and stress fuel mistakes, we sometimes witness how these supposed to be good player performing poorly. And this is one of those stories that we can get the lesson from. This time from the Sarundajang Cup 2015.

Indonesia is one of the big name in Bridge. And this year the inauguration of “Sarundajang Cup 2015” has seen prestigious bridge players from 11 countries came to beautiful city of Manado (famous with its Bunaken reef). Sarundajang is the name of the governor in there and this is kind of the Spingold version of Indonesia  not only for the amount of the prize money but also quality of the competitor.

After qualified to top 16 in the lower bracket at #12, it was Australia (Gabi Lorentz, Stephen Burgess, Matthew Thomson, Paul Marston) that need to challenge the runner-up of the qualifying round India (Subash Chandra Gupta, Hemant Kumar Jalan, Ashish Malhora, Sumit Mukherjee, Jyotindra Madhukar Shah,Debabrata Majumdar) in the two 3-way knock out matches. They have met each other in the qualifying round where India defeated Australia 19.10 – 0.9 VP.

On board 23, they saw this hand:


Game Trouble In Sarundajang Cup 2015

AQ62
Dealer: S
J84
Vul: All
86
A732
K94
AQT65
KJ9
K6
e[n/s]w
T5
9732
43
JT985
J873
K
AQT752
Q4

Open Room

West
North
East
South
Aust
India
Aust
India
1
1
DBL
Pass
1
Pass
2
All Pass

Opening Lead: K


Seeing all hands, you can see that there will be one loser each suit if declarer need to play the suit. So, the contract was correct at part-score only.
However, you do not want to be West who need to do the opening lead. Any opening lead will give declarer extra trick. Interesting, right ?
The Aussie chose to lead the Club and 10 tricks was scored – simple play: win Clubs, finesse Spade, losing Diamond finesse, lose a Heart and trump Heart return. Cash Spade, Ace Diamond and diamond Ruff. And lose another master trump for 10 tricks – +170 for India.

But the the interesting part was what happen in the Closed Room:

Closed Room

West
North
East
South
India
Aust
India
Aust
1
1
1
Pass
3
Pass
4
All Pass

Opening Lead:


FIRST, rather than bid DBL to show 4 cards Spade, the Aussie sits at North bid 1. Usually showing 5+ cards Spade. No wonder his partner with mere 12HCP – 7 loser and 2 wasted honor in singleton and doubleton jumped to 3 to invite for game – the SECOND matter to discuss. We will go back to these soon.

Hence, North – South playing with the good correct contract (as shown in the Open room) but with wrong declarer. Because unlike West, East can lead any suit and declarer will not get 10 tricks… The declarer was actually end up with only 8 tricks – the THIRD discussion point. Wait a minute, the record will show that declarer booked 9 tricks – of course… that’s the mis-CLAIM that unfortunately accepted by West – well,  FOURTH discussions points.

Let’s start.

FIRST – Double to Show 4 cards, Overcall to show 5

This is a handy useful convention that most people use. When partner open 1 minor and RHO (Right Hand Opponent) overcall with 1 Major – DBL will show you have the other major – exactly 4 cards. With 5 cards or more you can just do simple overcall. Playing Bridge at Australia circuit – that is pretty much that we are commonly using here, so a bit unusual the Aussie sat at North in this board did not use this. A bit pity as 4 would be an easy contract played by South.

SECOND – Invite with Less Loser

Holding South hand, is there anybody that think the hand is enticing at all? King singleton whose suit belong to LHO, doubleton Queen of Clubs and barely minimum 12 HCP with 7.5 losers hand.
Do you even open with that kind of hand ?
In my opinion, it is really borderline – third or fourth hand I will not open – but first or second probably still would.

THIRD – The Play

East lead the Jack of Club to the Queen King and Ace, continued by the losing Diamond finesse. 1-1.
West continue with cashing the Ace of Heart and another Club – which win by East’s 8. 1-3, 1 trick for declarer – 3 tricks for defender.

Another Club is next. Declarer trump with his 7, overruffed by West’s 9. Then 6 of Heart is played in which declarer won it with Jack while pitching Diamond deuce, continued by ruffing his last Heart 3-4. And here are the position up to this point:

AQ62
8
3
K4
QT
J9
e[n/s]w
T5
7
4
95
J8
AT75

Now, declarer finessing the Spade successfully and drop the King under the Ace and still continue yet another Spade to reach this position below. Remember declarer has already lose 4 tricks. However when he played the last trump the play stop and recorded as claimed by Declarer for 9 tricks: -100 or 7 imp lost for this board.

2
8
3
Q
J9
e[n/s]w
4
95
AT7

FOURTH – Misclaim?

Unless West foolishly threw away a Diamond on 2 of Spade (instead of the 13th Heart – hmm, West was counting, right? )  – there is no way declarer can win all tricks on the table (see above diagram). So, let’s assume West discard a Heart and declarer claim the rest of the trick. This is what known as “mis-claim” – And if neither defender objected, then that would be officially recorded as the official result.

On the table, just to be remembered, that if someone claim a result, they need to show the hand completely to the opponent – and if they did not tell you how they will gonna play it, you can ask partner to play any card as well as declarer to play any card of your choosing.

With the illustrated play, the correct contract’s result will be -200 and minus 9 imps for that board. Overall the Aussie beaten 26-0 imps that sessions (should be 28-0).

Hopefully we are all can be reminded of some factors discussed here. Well, keep playing Bridge !!

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